My Life at the Tower of London - Living with thousands of visitors in your front yard every day
A Quick Guide to the Towers
 
Most people, when they think of the Tower of London, believe that there is only one Tower, and that being the White Tower.  There were in fact 22 Towers in the Tower of London which is situated on 18 square acres of land on a commanding position on the North bank of the Thames river where in Roman times, was the first place on the Thames that was safest to have a bridge built across the river, and so it was a strategic point where entry to the city and further up stream into the then heart of England could be gained; thus whoever controlled this position controlled England.
 
This page will give the viewer a quick guide to the 22 towers within the complex of the Tower of London although unfortunately two towers, the Wardrobe and Lion, are now but ruins.
 
 
A map of the Towers
A map of the Towers
The White Tower
Commissioned in 1078 by William the Bastard of Normandy, unfortunately he died before it was completed
The White Tower
The Bell Tower
The Bell Tower
The Bell Tower is the second oldest tower and was built between 1190 and 1210 during the reigns of Richard the Lion King John, his younger brother.
The Wardrobe Tower
The tower was built between 1190-1199 during the reign of Richard the Lion Heart and it's purpose was to house the jewels and personal effects of the Royal Family.
The Wardrobe Tower
The Bloody Tower
The Bloody Tower
Built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and was known as the Garden Tower. The name was later changed after the tower was nicknamed the Bloody Tower because of all the supposed blood shed within it.
The Bowyer Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and is the tower where George, Duke of Clarence was imprisoned by his brother, King Edward IV, for treason. George waslater supposedly drowned in a barrel of malmsey wine in 1478.
The Bowyer Tower
The Brick Tower
The Brick Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and is where Sir Walter Raleigh was first imprisoned within the Tower. His first crime was marrying a lady in waiting (Elizabeth Throckmorton) of Queen Elizabeth I without the Queen's permission.
The Broad Arrow Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272)
The Broad Arrow Tower
The Byward Tower
The Byward Tower
The tower built during the reign of King Henry II (1238-1272) as the Gatehouse of the Outer Ward. It was reinforced during the reign of King Richard II in 1381, after the Peasants Revolt.
The Constable Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) as a residence for the 'keeper of the Tower' also known as the Constable of the Tower. Today there is still a Constable of the Tower although he is no longer in residence there
The Constable Tower
The Deveraux Tower
The Deveraux Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272)
The Flint Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272)
The Flint Tower
The Lanthorn Tower
The Lanthorn Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and is the second largest tower within the grounds. It is so named after the light which was hung there to guide ships up the river Thames
The Martin Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and is one the towers where the crown jewels were kept for a period. It is also the tower where Capt Blood tried to steal the crown jewels in 1671.
The Martin Tower
The Middle Tower
The Middle Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272)
The Salt Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272).

The tower was once home to the King of Scotland, John Baliol, and was once referred to as Baliol's Tower. It has also housed the prisoner, Hew Draper of Brystow, in 1561, who was said to have been a sorcerer.
The Salt Tower
The Lion Tower
The Lion Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry III (1238-1272) and housed the Royal Menagerie for many years, until the animals were then relocated to what is now London Zoo located in Regent's Park, London. The remains of this tower can been seen at the main entrance gates to the Tower of London.
The Beauchamp Tower
Built between 1275-1281, during the reign of Edward I. It was the prison of Lady Jane Rochford who was sister-in-law to Anne Boleyn and later a lady in waiting to Katherine Howard - both were executed by King Henry VIII on the testimony that she gave, Lady Rochford herself was sent mad by interrogation and later executed.
The Beauchamp Tower
The Devlin Tower
The Devlin Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Edward 1 in 1282.
The St Thomas Tower
The tower was built between 1275-1279 during the reign of King Edward I in honour of the late Archbishop off Canterbury. Thomas Becket, who was murdered by knights loyal to King Henry II (King Edward I grandfather) in 1170.
The St Thomas Tower
The Wakefield Tower
The Wakefield Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Henry II (1238-1272). It is also where King Henry VI was murdered on 22nd May, 1470 whilst he was at prayers in the small chapel in the tower on the orders of King Edward IV.
The Well Tower
The tower was built between 1275-1279 during the reign of King Edward I
The Well Tower
The Cradle Tower
The Cradle Tower
The tower was built during the reign of King Edward III in around 1360. Later it became the tower from which Father John Gerrad made a successful escape in 1599.